Resistance and Destruction in the Częstochowa Ghetto (<1952)

Resistance and Destruction in the Częstochowa Ghetto (<1952)

by Liber Brener

This Yizkor Book was published in Wrocław, Poland, prior to 1952.

The introduction to this Yizkor Book states:

This work by Liber Brener which we present, ‘Resistance and Destruction in the Częstochowa Ghetto’, is an expansion and an elaboration of a diary, which the author kept during a lengthy period in the ghetto and [labour] camp. Following liberation, L. Brener recovered these memoirs, revised them and complemented them with an array of German, Polish and Yiddish documents, as well as with testimonies from other surviving Jews from the Częstochowa Ghetto.”

Liber BRENER (1897-1986), was a teacher, social activist and chronicler. He was born on 4th November 1897 in Turzysk (Wołyń), the son of Naftali and Chana.

The Breners were a poor Chassidic family. His father was a gabbai (managing the court) of the son of the Turzysk tzaddik, Reb Dodie (Dawid Aron Twersk)i, later to become a tzaddik in both Żarki and Częstochowa. His mother owned a small stall selling flour.

After the war, Brener went to work for the Yiddish-Buch publishing house in Warsaw. He was the editor of books published, in Yiddish, for schools and adult readers. The Communist Party’s antisemitic campaign, in 1967 and 1968, forced Brener to leave Poland for Israel.

In translating this Yizkor Book, every effort has been made to translate, as accurately as possible, the Yiddish text and to transliterate (and double-check) the names of people and places as they would have been spelt in a historically, accurate manner (surnames may have been changed post-War). This includes the use of Polish diacritics where appropriate.
(Such care and research may not have been carried out in translations of this Yizkor Book appearing elsewhere.)

This Yizkor book, in its entirety, is being professionally translated into English.

The professional English translation of this Yizkor book has been made possible by the financial support of the

Wolf Rajcher z”l and Dora Rajcher z”l were both Holocaust survivors from Częstochowa.

They were prisoners in both the “Big Ghetto” and the “Small Ghetto” and, until liberation, were slave labourers in HASAG-Pelcery. Following the War, they emigrated to Melbourne Australia.

Upon the passing of both his parents, their son, Andrew Rajcher, established this charitable fund in their memory.

Chapters are listed in the order in which they appear in the Yizkor Book.
(The numbers in brackets, after each article, correspond to the appropriate page numbers in the Yizkor Book.)

Table of Contents (Created by translator)

Introduction (0-4)

The First Tortures (5-11)

The Judenrat and its Authority (11-20)

The Ghetto (20-25)

Forced Labour (25-32)

Jews Would Escape from the Collection Point (32-34)

The Jewish Police (35-39)

The Economic Situation of the Jews in the Ghetto (39-42)

Social Aid (43-51)


ENGLISH TRANSLATION:

Dave Horowitz-Larochette


IMPORTANT NOTICE

While the English translation is available for download, it may not, either in part or as a whole, be distributed or published without the prior written permission of Andrew Rajcher, the copyright-holder of this English-language version of this Yizkor Book.


Churbn Czenstochow (1949)

Churbn Czenstochow (1949)

"The Destruction of Częstochowa" - by Szlomo Waga

This Yizkor Book was published in Buenos Aires, in 1949, by the Central Union of Polish Jewry in Argentina [Unión Central Israelita Polaca en la Argentina].

In his review of this book, published in the Czenstochov (1958) Yizkor Book, Dr. W. Gliksman writes:

“Szlomo Waga’s book is based mainly on personal experiences. In the book, no other sources or testimonies are presented other than the events which the author lived through himself and to which he was eyewitness…..

Certain events, such as “Bloody Monday” for instance, which caused the author himself to become azakładnik’ [hostage], Waga describes more comprehensively. In others, he limits himself to a briefer account….

Waga also did not fail to note the moral descent of the elements which served in the police force. It is understood that the element, in general, is being dealt with here and not individual, good people ‐ exceptions. Waga witnessed the debauchery of the constables, high officials of the ‘Judenrat’ and similar servants [of the Nazis] at the city’s night locales, while the masses of people were starving. Here, above all, the martyrdom of the children emerges, who were the providers of livelihood for poor homes…..”

In translating this Yizkor Book, every effort has been made to translate, as accurately as possible, the Yiddish text and to transliterate (and double-check) the names of people and places as they would have been spelt in a historically, accurate manner (surnames may have been changed post-War). This includes the use of Polish diacritics where appropriate. (Such care and research may not have been carried out in translations of this Yizkor Book appearing elsewhere.)

This Yizkor book, in its entirety, has been professionally translated into English.

The professional English translation of this Yizkor book has been made possible by the financial support of the

Wolf Rajcher z”l and Dora Rajcher z”l were both Holocaust survivors from Częstochowa.

They were prisoners in both the “Big Ghetto” and the “Small Ghetto” and, until liberation, were slave labourers in HASAG-Pelcery. Following the War, they emigrated to Melbourne Australia.

Upon the passing of both his parents, their son, Andrew Rajcher, established this charitable fund in their memory.

Chapters are listed in the order in which they appear in the Yizkor Book.
(The numbers in brackets, after each article, correspond to the appropriate page numbers in the Yizkor Book.)

Introduction (1-6)

Table of Contents (7-8)

I – The Germans in Częstochowa (9-10)

II – “Bloody Monday” (11-16)

III – Under the Nazi Yoke (12-26)

IV – More Mortal Fear (26-30)

V – Pillage and Sadism (30-33)

VI – “Aryans” (33-36)

VII – The First Decrees (36-39)

VIII – Vandalism on the Part of the Volksdeutschen (39-41)

IX – Taxes and Evictions (41-47)

X – In the Claws of the Gestapo (47-56)

XI – Persecutions and Thievery (56-59)

XII – News From Łódź (59-63)

XIII – Slavery (63-69)

XIV – Cieszanów Labour Camp (69-75)

XV – The Activity of the Judenrat (75-85)

XVI – “Aryanisation” of Jewish Businesses (85-89)

XVII – The Liquidation of Jewish Factories (89-95)

XVIII – “Providing for Culture” (95-97)

XIX – Extermination (97-100)

XX – Ghetto (100-108)

XXI – Lost Souls (108-115)

XXII – Jewish Police (115-120)

XXIII – Life Goes On… (120-122)

XXIV – The New War (123-125)

XXV – The Masses Starve (125-130)

XXVI – Traitors (130-140)

XXVII – Intensified Terror (140-146)

XXVIII – The Akcja [Operation] of 22nd September 1942 (146-154)

XXIX – The Second Akcja (154-155)

XXX – Hunger in the Ghetto (155-159)

XXXI – Bunkers (159-165)

XXXII – The Third Akcja (165-168)

XXXIII – The Subsequent Akcje (168-179)

XXXIV – The New Ghetto (179-181)

XXXV – From Ghetto to “Labour Camp” (181-183)

XXXVI – In the “Labour Camp” (183-196)

XXXVII – Yet Another Akcja (197-208)

XXXVIII – “Aryans” and “Muslims” (208-210)

XXXIX – Three Ghettoes (210-211)

XL – The End of the Craftsmen’s House (212-219)

XLI – “The Journey to Palestine” (219-225)

From the Publisher (226-231)

Translator’s Comment:

After reading this Yizkor book, it seems that Waga’s book ends rather abruptly. Just by reading it, one cannot but wonder what happened to the author, or indeed his wife and children, followng the massacre of the Częstochowa intellectuals on Purim 1943.  His story is obviously just halfway told and there has to be more to it.


ENGLISH TRANSLATION:

Dave Horowitz-Larochette


IMPORTANT NOTICE

While the English translation is available for download, it may not, either in part or as a whole, be distributed or published without the prior written permission of Andrew Rajcher, the copyright-holder of this English-language version of this Yizkor Book.


Churban Czenstochow (1948)

Churban Czenstochow (1948)

"The Destruction of Częstochowa" - by Benjamin Orenstein

This Yizkor Book was published, in 1948, by the Central Administration of the Częstochower Landsmannschaft in the American Zone in Germany. Being published so soon after World War Two, when memories of the horrors are still fresh, it provides us with even more insights into the destruction of Częstochowa Jewry.

As Dr Filip Friedman states in the book’s Foreword:

The author set himself the task of encompassing the tragedy of the Częstochowa Jews as comprehensively as possible. He described it in the tone of the pulsating Jewish life in Częstochowa prior to the War. ….

I am sure that Orenstein’s work introduces much new information with the abundance of materials that he has gathered, with his comprehensiveness and descriptions and his systematic and transparent composition of the historical material. …..

It is a work which constitutes an important contribution to the historical research of the era of destruction, and is concurrently a worthy and earnest memorial to the Jewish community of Częstochowa …

In his introduction to the book, Dr Cwi Kantor writes:

… the book has been published in the Latin script. [In] this, the Central Administration has taken into account the fact that – to our great regret – there is still a great part of the Jews in Germany and overseas for whom it is difficult or who are completely unable to read any quadrilateral Yiddish letters.

[Webmaster: There are two Yizkor Books written with the same title – “Churban Czenstochow” – one by Szlomo Waga and, this one, by Benjamin Orenstein. As far as we know, this is the FIRST PROFESSIONAL, English-language translation of this book.]


This Yizkor book has been PROFESSIONALLY translated into English,
for the FIRST TIME, in its entirety!

The professional English translation of this Częstochowa Yizkor book has been made possible by the financial support of the

Wolf Rajcher z”l and Dora Rajcher z”l were both Holocaust survivors from Częstochowa.

They were prisoners in both the “Big Ghetto” and the “Small Ghetto” and, until liberation, were slave labourers in HASAG-Pelcery. Following the War, they emigrated to Melbourne Australia.

Upon the passing of both his parents, their son, Andrew Rajcher, established this charitable fund in their memory.

Click on PART No. HEADINGS to reveal chapters.
Chapters are listed in the order in which they appear in the Yizkor Book.
(The numbers in brackets, after each article, correspond to the appropriate page numbers in the book.)

Introduction (1-3)

Table of Contents (4-7)

Foreword – by Dr Filip Friedman (8-9)

The Book Churban Czenstochow – by Dr Cwi Kantor (10-11)

Introduction (12-17)

Excesses Against Jews in Częstochowa (18-22)

Economic Life (22-27)

Jewish Communal Life Before the War (27-33)

Political Life (33-36)

Cultural Life (37-47)

Cultural Life (37-47)

The Outbreak of the War (47-50)

“Bloody Monday” (51-53)

The First Days of the German Occupying Authorities (54-56)

The Establishment of the Judenrat (57-62)

The Unpaid Work Force (63-65)

“The White House” (65-67)

The Formation of the “Big Ghetto” (67-70)

The Jewish Police – Inspectorate of Street Traffic & Jewish Ordnungsdienst (70-72)

Life in the Ghetto (72-78)

The Workers Council (79-86)

The End of the Workers Council in the “Big Ghetto” (86-88)

The First Test Run & First “Resettlement” – 22nd September 1942 (89-94)

The First to be Barracked in HASAG-Pelcery (95-96)

Other Barracks Sites  (97-98)

The Second “Resettlement”  (98-100)

The Third “Resettlement”  (100-100)

The Fourth “Resettlement”  (100-100)

The Fifth “Resettlement”  (101-102)

The People in the Bunkers and Their Fate (102-119)

Selection Amidst the Ghetto Police (120-121)

The Möbellager (121-124)

Metalurgia (124-125)

Braland (125-126)

Ul. Garibaldiego (126-127)

Raków (128-130)

Enro (130-132)

Warta (132-136)

Częstochowianka (136-138)

The Underground Movement (139-145)

The Jewish Fighting Organisation [ŻOB] (146-151)

Production of Grenades in the Częstochowa “Small Ghetto” (151-154)

Mojtek Zylberberg (155-156)

Rywka Glanc (156-158)

Josl Kantor (158-159)

Nute Słomnicki (159-159)

Jechezkel Kantor (160-161)

Arje Mendelbaum (161-161)

Berl (Bolek) Gewercman (161-162)

Janek Krauze (162-164)

Izrael-Awigdor Szyldhaus (164-165)

Eliezer Szmulewicz (165-166)

Cwi Rozenwajn (167-169)

Gerszon Prętki (170-170)

Mojsze Lubling (171-172)

Bernard Kurland (172-174)

Marzej Krauze (174-178)

Mordche Herman (178-178)

Rozenberg (180-180)

Mojsze Domb [Dąb] (181-184)

The Role of Częstochowers in Treblinka (185-193)

The Formation of the “Small Ghetto” (194-195)

Life in the “Small Ghetto” (196-197)

The Attitude of the Polish Populace Towards the Persecuted Jews (198-200)

Jewish Communal and Cultural Life in the “Big Ghetto”, the “Small Ghetto” and the HASAG-Pelcery Camp (200-219)

Częstochower Folklore During the Nazi Period (220-222)

“Aryan Papers” (223-225)

Obłway – Round-Ups and Manhunts (225-229)

Selections (230-234)

Propraganda (234-236)

The Murderers of Częstochowa Jewry (237-246)

The Development of Events in the “Small Ghetto” and Its Liquidation (247-257)

Life in HASAG-Pelcery and Its Organisational System (257-261)

Selections in HASAG-Pelcery (262-263)

Life in HASAG-Pelcery, Until November 1944, Following the Selection on 24th July 1943 (263-269)

Dr. Bresler (270-271)

Bartenschlager’s Rule in HASAG-Pelcery – From November 1944 to 16th January 1945 (271-274)

The Fate of Those Removed From HASAG-Pelcery (274-277)

The Evacuation Transport from Częstochowa to Buchenwald (277-281)

Life in the Dora Concentration Camp (281-291)

What is a Kapo? (291-292)

The Evacuation from Dora to Bergen-Belsen (293-295)

Liberation in Bergen-Belsen (295-297)

Częstochowa’s [Surviving] Remnant (301-311)

Speech by Estera Epsztajn (312-313)

Speech by Henoch Pradelski (314-316)

Speech by Dr Cwi Kantor (317-319)

Speech by Benjamin Orenstein (319-321)

Speech by Aron Gelbard (321-324)

Speech by Cwi Rozenwajn (324-326)

Speech by Dr. Szmul Gringauz (327-327)

Speech by Mendel Goldberg (327-328)

Speech by Chaim Sztajer (328-328)

Poems by Szulim Bergman (329-332)

Second Congresses of the Liberated in the American Zone (333-334)

Częstochowa Delegation at the Unveiling of a Monument in Mallersdorf (335-336)

Life Goes On (337-337)

Isroel-Josef Kutner z’’l (338-340)

Efrojim-Nechemje Trombkowski z’’l  (341-343)

Introduction  (347-347)

Religious Authorities – Rabbi Nachum Asz z’’l  (348-349)

Religious Authorities – Rabbi Mojsze Halter z’’l  (350-350)

Religious Authorities – The Częstochower Maggid (350-351)

Religious Authorities – Rabbinical Judges [Dayanim] (351-352)

Religious Authorities – Ritual Slaughterers [Shochtim] (352-353)

Cantors – Abram-Ber Birenbaum z’’l [and Zyskind Rozental, Josef Badasz] (353-356)

Artists – Professor [Icchak] Zaks (356-357)

Artists – Ajzyk Karpiel (357-358)

Artists – Professor [Perec] Wilenberg (358-359)

Synagogue Custodians [Shamoshim] – Urn Shames (359-360)

Synagogue Custodians [Shamoshim] – Kalman Szczekacz (361-361)

Synagogue Custodians [Shamoshim] – Majer Biczner (362-362)

Jewish Kehilla Presidents [& Public Figures] – Szmul Goldsztajn (362-363)

Jewish Kehilla Presidents [& Public Figures] – Josef [sic Jakób] Rozenberg (363-363)

Jewish Kehilla Presidents [& Public Figures] – Chaim Weksler (363-364)

Jewish Kehilla Presidents [& Public Figures] – Szmul Niemirowski (364-366)

Jewish Kehilla Presidents [& Public Figures] – Icyk-Mendel Epsztajn (366-368)

Jewish Kehilla Presidents [& Public Figures] – Abram Działowski (368-368)

Philanthropists – Henryk Markusfeld (369-370)

Philanthropists – the Zygman, Markowicz and Helman Families (370-370)

Philanthropists – Emanuel Wajcenblat (371-371)

Philanthropists – Icze Rotholc (“Porper”) (371-372)

Philanthropists – Dr Hipolit Gajsler (372-372)

Philanthropists – Dr Arnold Bram (373-373)

Philanthropists – Icchok-Majer Krel (373-374)

Paramedics [Felczerzy] – Kopel Kijak (374-375)

Paramedics [Felczerzy] – Wolf [sic Dawid] Windman (375-375)

Women in the Financial Arena (375-376)

Booksellers – Henoch Lapidus and Emanuel Bajgele (376-377)

Booksellers – Fiszel Zajdman (377-378)

The Press – Bocian, Kac and Wajsberg (378-379)

The Press – Editor Ido [Izydor Izaak] Siemiatycki (379-381)

The Press – A. Ch. Sziper (381-382)

The Press – Mojsze Gotlib (382-382)

Teachers – Szacherowna (382-383)

Teachers – Lajbel Landau (383-385)

Sport – Jewish Sportsmen (385-386)

Sport – Efroim (Fredek) Szmaragd (386-387)

Actors – Szaja Borensztajn (389-389)

Actors – Chaim Orbach (389-390)

Częstochower Klezmers (390-391)

Local Characters – Szaje’le Kromołowski (391-392)

Local Characters – Three Noteworthy Families (393-393)

Local Characters – The “Toughs” (393-394)

Local Characters – Organ Grinders & Thieves (394-394)

Local Characters – Królowa [Queen] Jadwiga (395-395)

Local Characters – Madmen (395-396)

Calendar [Chronology] & Yuhrzeits (397-399)

Protocols of Authentication (400-400)

Material Sources (401-403)

Bibliography (404-405)

To All the Częstochower Landsmannschaften and Landsleit (407-407)

In Eternal Memory – Part 1 (409-436)

In Eternal Memory – Part 2 (437-463)


ENGLISH TRANSLATION:

Dave Horowitz-Larochette


IMPORTANT NOTICE

While this English translation is available for download, it may not, either in part or as a whole, be distributed or published without the prior written permission of Andrew Rajcher, this English-language version copyright-holder.



Academic Consultative Panel

Academic Consultative Panel

- preserving the words of our Holocaust Survivors for future generations

WHY DO WE HAVE AN ACADEMIC CONSULTATIVE PANEL?

In order to aid in the accuracy of the facts, contained in the texts of authors in the Yizkor Book translations within our Częstochowa Yizkor Book Project, we have formed an Academic Consultative Panel, comprising four outstanding Polish historians, who each have considerable knowledge and experience in the Jewish history of Poland.

The World Society is very fortunate to have found DAVE HOROWITZ-LAROCHETTE as our translator who, not only translates from Hebrew AND Yiddish, but is also pedantic as to the accuracy of his translations. He is also very aware of any historical anomalies that arise and he goes above and beyond the call of duty when it comes to explanations to help the reader more fully understand the text. This is attested to by the many footnotes which he adds to his translations.

When details of a particular incident, from before, during or after the War, differ in the account of one Yizkor Book article writer, from details about the SAME incident as written by another Yizkor Book article writer, these anomalies will be referred to the Academic Consultative Panel for their opinion. These anomalies usually relate to differences in dates, the names of the Nazis involved, the names and numbers of victims and even the names of streets and places which may have since changed. While the text of the article will be translated as written by the author, the Panel’s opinion will be included as a footnote on the appropriate page.

We believe that having this panel of experts will further our aim and obligation – to translate, into English, ACCURATELY AND COMPLETELY, the words of Holocaust Survivors speaking, from the “beyond the grave”, to us and to future generations.

THE ACADEMIC CONSULTATIVE PANEL

Professor Dr. hab. JERZY MIZGALSKI

Professor Mizgalski is a long-term friend of the World Society of Częstochowa Jews & Their Descendants, having been the creator and curator of “The Jews of Częstochowa” exhibition, which has now found a permanent home in the Częstochowa Jewish Museum. He has served the Pedagogical University in Częstochowa (now the Jan Długosz University in Częstochowa) as Deputy Dean for Student Affairs in the Faculty of Philology and History and as Deputy-Rector for Teaching and Student Affairs. One of his special academic achievements is the development of research into the history of the Jewish population in Częstochowa in the 20th century. Professor Mizgalski has written three monographs, forty-four chapters in monographs and academic articles and edited or co-edited thirteen collective works.

Professor Dr. hab. MAGDALENA RUTA

Professor Magdalena Ruta, a native of Częstochowa, is Associate Professor at the Institute of Jewish Studies at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, where she teaches Yiddish language and literature. She has translated several prose  works from Yiddish into Polish and published numerous articles on modern Yiddish literature and culture. She is the editor of several books, among them being Under the Red Banner: Yiddish Culture in the Communist Countries in the Post-war Era (co-edited with Elvira Groezinger, 2008), and a tri-lingual (Yiddish-Polish- English) anthology, Nisht bay di taykhn fun Bovl / Not on the Rivers of Babylon: An anthology of Yiddish Poetry in the post-WW2 Poland, (2012). Her monographs include Without Jews? Yiddish Literature in the People’s Republic of Poland on the Holocaust, Poland and Communism (2012).

Professor Dr. hab. JANUSZ SPYRA

Professor Janusz Spyra, a history graduate from the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, is a professor at the Institute of History at the Jan Długosz University of Humanities and Sciences in Częstochowa. He is the author of nine monographs, incl. Rabbiner in der Provinz. Die Rolle des Rabbiners im Leben der jüdischen Gemeinschaft in Teschener und Troppauer Schlesien, Peter Lang Verlag, Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warsaw, Vienna 2018 and over two hundred academic articles. He specialises in the history of Górny Śląsk (Upper Silesia) Jewry in modern times in Upper Silesia, especially in Cieszyn Silesia.

Professor Dr. hab. DARIUSZ STOLA

Professor Stola is former Director of the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews. He is a renowned historian and is currently a professor at the Institute for Political Studies in the Polish Academy of Sciences. He specialises in the history of the Holocaust, Polish-Jewish relations, human migrations and in the history of Poland’s post-War Communist regime. He has authored and edited numerous books, and over one hundred scholarly works. In recognition of his achievements, Professor Stola has received numerous scholarships, awards and accolades.

Click HERE to return to Częstochowa Yizkor Books Project main page.

The Częstochowa Yizkor Books Project has been made possible by the financial support of the

Wolf Rajcher z”l and Dora Rajcher z”l were both Holocaust survivors from Częstochowa.

They were prisoners in both the “Big Ghetto” and the “Small Ghetto” and, until liberation, were slave labourers in HASAG-Pelcery. Following the War, they emigrated to Melbourne Australia.

Upon the passing of both his parents, their son, Andrew Rajcher, established this charitable fund in their memory.


Czenstochower Yidn

The Jews of Częstochowa (1947)

Czenstochower Yidn

This Yizkor Book was published in New York, in 1947, by the United Czenstochower Relief Committee & Ladies Auxiliary. In all probability, it is the second Yizkor Book, relating to Częstochowa, to be published after the War, second only to Adam Zilbersztajn’s The Ghettoes – Warsaw, Częstochowa. So that, to the book’s contributors, their memories would still be very fresh.

According to this Yizkor Book’s Editorial Committee:

The “Kehilla” of 30,000 Jewish souls in Częstochowa, with the exception of a small remnant, shared the fate of the 3,500,000 Polish Jews and of the six million Jewish victims of Nazism and Fascism in Europe. Yet our book, “Czenstochower Yidn”, was not created as a stone “matzevah” in the cemetery of Jewish Częstochowa, but as a “Book of Life”.

The writing of this “Book of Life”, about all of the generations and layers of Jewish population who struggled and who created our home city, was our duty. The memory of Jewish Częstochowa has been sanctified a thousand-fold by the martyred deaths of our brothers and sisters.

Our “Book of Life”, “Czenstochower Yidn” is also our “Book of Lineage”. The Częstochowa neighbourhood, which was built and inhabited by Jews, is now either utterly ruined or settled by non-Jews. A large number of institutions, which were the pride of the Jewish community, will most likely be taken over by strangers. All the Jewish streets, all the Jewish houses, all Jewish institutions belong to us. We will always take pride in them and honour those who created them.


This Yizkor book, in its entirety, has been professionally translated into English.

 

The professional English translation of this Yizkor book has been made possible by the financial support of the

Wolf Rajcher z”l and Dora Rajcher z”l were both Holocaust survivors from Częstochowa.

They were prisoners in both the “Big Ghetto” and the “Small Ghetto” and, until liberation, were slave labourers in HASAG-Pelcery. Following the War, they emigrated to Melbourne Australia.

Upon the passing of both his parents, their son, Andrew Rajcher, established this charitable fund in their memory.

Click on SECTION HEADINGS to reveal chapters.
Chapters are listed in the order in which they appear in the Yizkor Book.
(The numbers in brackets, after each article, correspond to the appropriate page numbers in the Yizkor Book.)

Introduction (I-II)

Table of Contents (III-IV)

Foreword – from the Editorial Board (V-VI)

Preface – from the Editor (VII-XII)

Introduction (1-2)

Dr. Jakow Szacki: The Jews in Częstochowa to the First War World (3-31)

Ch. L. Szwarc: Częstochowa Becomes a City (32-46)

D.Bezbrodko: The Jews in Industry (47-50)

Dr.R.Mahler, J.Sz. Herc, A.Chrobolovsky: Professional Workers’ Unions (50-60)

A.Chrobolovsky: Professional Union of Commercial Employees (60-61)

A.Gotlib: The Craftsmen’s Union and Guilds (61-64)

A.Szymonowicz: The Craftsmen’s Ha’Chalutz (64-65)

A.Buchman: The Gardening School (66-68)

A.Gotlib: The Crafts School (68-70)

Chaja Wage-Rotman, A.Chrobolovsky, R.Federman: The I.L. Peretz Workers’ Kindergartens & Primary School  (70-77)

S.Wirstel: The Jewish Gymnazjum  (78-79)

A. Chrobolovsky: Evening Courses  (79-80)

P. Szmulewicz, A. Chrobolovsky: Lira & the Jewish Literary Society  (80-85)

A. Chrobolovsky: Jewish Libraries  (85-87)

W. Gliksman, A. Chrobolovsky, R. Federman: Yiddish Theatre in Częstochowa  (87-92)

A. Chrobolovsky, M. Ceszynski, R. Federman: The Yiddish Press  (92-101)

A. Chrobolovsky: The Jewish Sports Movement  (101-103)

A. Kaufman: The New Study-Hall (103-104)

Dr. Kohn-Kolin, F.Szmulewicz: Dobroczyność (105-107)

From the Częstochower Wochenblatt – 31st October 1913: The Jewish Hospital (107-108)

F.Szmulewicz: The Popular Bakery (109-110)

Dr. Kohn-Kolin: TOZ (110-111)

A. Chrobolovsky: Częstochower Cooperatives (111-111)

Pictures for the Article The I.L. Peretz Kindergartens & Primary School (112-112)

C.  Szpaltyn, F. Szmulewicz: The Relief Committee for Refugees from Germany (113-114)

Icek Gurski, S. Fajnrajch, Fajtel Szmulewicz, A. Chrobolovsky: SS (Zionist-Socialist Workers Party), Vereinigte”, “Independent” (115-122)

M. Fajnrajch: SS (Zionist-Socialist Workers Party) in the War Against the “Good Boys” (122-123)

Sz. J. Herc: The General Jewish Labour Bund (123-144)

Jakow Kenner: Left-Wing Poalei Zion (144-150)

Chaim Landau: Ha’Shomer Ha’Tzair (150-152)

A. Chrolobovsky, H. Zigas: Political Persecutions and Trials (152-156)

Gina Medem: Jewish Fighters in the Fields of Spain (157-165)

Dr Raphael Mahler: Foreword (165-166)

Mark Liber: The “Rabunek” – the Pogrom of 1902 (166-170)

H. Fajwlowicz, A. Chrobolosky: The Second Pogrom (170-177)

Sz. Herc & Correspondents of the New York “Tog”: The Third Pogrom (177-183)

A. Chrolobovsky: The Last Year (183-186)

L.Brener: The Settlement’s Catastrophe (187-201)

A.B. [Aron Brandes]: Testimony (201-206)

Abram Iżbicki: Testimony (206-212)

Szymon Gotajner: Jews Deported to Germany via Częstochowa (212-215)

W. Gliksman: The Obliteration of the Synagogue (the New Shule) (215-218)

A. Iżbicki: A Night in the Częstochowa Ghetto (218-219)

D. Koniecpoler: The Last Twenty-Four Hours in HASAG (220-222)

M.Kusznir: Activity of the Jewish Ordnungsdienst – the Jewish Police (223-226)

M.Kusznir: Activity of the Bund Under Hitler’s Occupation (226-230)

L.Jurysta: The Activity of the Kibbutz During German Occupation (230-232)

Chaskiel Brzeziński: How the Party Banners of the Left-Wing Poalei Zion were Hidden (232-232)

D.Koniecpoler: The Craftsmen and the Destruction (233-233)

Regulations of the German Authorities – from the Archives of the Central Jewish Historical Committee in Poland (233-239)

Dr Josef Kruk: The End (239-243)

Reprinted from the “Landersberger Lager Zeitung”: Revenge is Sweet (243-246)

Reprinted from the Częstochowa “Głos Narodu”: The Nazi Bandit Shall Hang at the Scaffold (246-247)

L.Brener: For the Third Anniversary of the First Jewish Uprising in the Częstochowa Ghetto (247-249)

Wolf Gliksman: The New Częstochowa (249-252)

Ida Merżan: The Children’s Home in Częstochowa (253-254)

Introduction & Documents re: General Overview of the Fraternal Aid (255-256)

A. Chrobolovsky: A General Overview of the Fraternal Aid (257-264)

A. Kaufman: Czenstochover Aid Society and Czenstochover Relief Committee in New York (265-269)

A. Chrobolovsky & A. Kaufman: The United Czenstochover Relief Committee in New York (269-277)

A. Chrobolovsky: Czenstochover Relief Activists in New York (277-281)

J. Kirszenbaum: The Częstochower Shul [Synagogue] in New York (281-282)

Josef Kaufman: The Czenstochauer Young Men’s (282-285)

A. Kaufman: The Czenstochover Young Ladies Auxiliary in New York (286-288)

A. Litman: Częstochower Branch 261 Arbeiter Ring in New York (289-292)

D. Tanski: Częstochower Branch 11 of the Jewish People’s Fraternal Order (292-298)

J.Win: Częstochower Branch of the Jewish National Workers Alliance (298-299)

D. Tanski: The Częstochower Patronage in New York (299-302)

Founders, Members and Supporters of the Czenstochover Aid Society and Czenstochover  Relief Committee (303-303)

R. Pozner: Chenstochover Neighbourhood Educational Society in Chicago (303-305)

M. Cieszyński: Chenstochover Independent Verein in Chicago (306-309)

P. Prodel: Chenstochover Ladies Aid Society in Chicago (309-310)

J. Gliksman: Chenstochover Rajoner Verein in Detroit (310-313)

H. Grauman: Chenstochover [& Vicinity] Aid Society in Los Angeles (313-315)

H. Grauman: The Częstochower Patronage in Los Angeles (315-316)

D. Tanski: The Rozenblat-Dykerman Circle in New York (317-317)

R. Federman: The National Conference of the Częstochower Landsmannschaften in America and Canada (318-327)

Mary Rozen: There Once Was a Shtetl Działoszyn (328-330)

R. Federman: Erste Zaloshiner Chevra Anshei Bnei Achim in New York (330-337)

P. Kalka: Nowo Radomsko (337-340)

P. Kalka: Nowo Radomsker Landsmannschaft in New York (340-342)

H. Jelen: Kamyk (342-344)

Częstochowers in the Land of Israel (345-347)

F. Szmulewicz, G. Frajtag: A Gathering of Częstochowers in Tel-Aviv (348-350)

Documents from Częstochower Organisations in America & Canada (350-350)

W. Gliksman: Chenstochover and Vicinity Aid Society in Toronto (Canada) (351-352)

W. Gliksman: Chenstochover and Vicinity Aid Society in Montreal (Canada) (353-354)

S. Wirstel: Society of Częstochower Landsleit in Argentina (354-355)

D. Wrocławski: Częstochowers in Paris (355-358)

Abram Rajzen: A Day in Częstochowa (359-360)

Lajbisz Lehrer: Częstochowa, My Częstochowa (360-361)

A. Chrobolovsky: In and Around the Workers Club (361-362)

Szymon Biro [Birencwajg]: Częstochower Coalminers (363-364)

Dr L. Lazarowicz: Doctors (364-366)

F. Gerbowski : A Bunch of Flowers (366-367)

Bela Goldwirt : Anonymous Landsleit (367-368)

A. Chrobolovsky: The Malarskies (368-373)

Raphael Federman: From My Life (374-398)

The Editorial Board: The History of the Book Czenstochover Yidn (399-403)

Dr Mahler’s Biography & a Few Co-Workers (404-404)

In translating the following “Who’s Who” section, every effort has been made to transliterate, from the Yiddish texts, as accurately as possible, the names as they would have been spelt in a historically, accurate manner (surnames may have been changed post-War). This includes the use of Polish diacritics where appropriate. (Such care and research may not have been carried out in translations of this section appearing elsewhere.)
Nevertheless, if you cannot find a name you seek here, please try alternate spellings: e.g. Rajcher/Reicher, Rubinsztajn/Rubinstein, Dembiński/Dębinski, Chorowicz/Horowicz, Nusyn/Nusen, Chiel/Chil, Rywka/Rifka, Sara/Sura, Jacob/Jakób/Jakub, etc..  Different spellings, such as these, may also impact any family tree genealogical research.
Should you need any advice regarding the appropriate Polish spellings of Jewish names or surnames, please feel free to contact the Webmaster.

Index of Names Appearing in this “Who’s Who” Section

א [Aleph] – surnames beginning with A, I and O (I-IV)

ב [Beit] – surnames beginning with B (IV-XIII)

ג [Gimel] – surnames beginning with G (XIII-XXVII)

ד [Daled] – surnames beginning with D and J (XXVII-XXX)

ה [Hey] – surnames beginning with H (XXX-XXXIV)

 וו [Vav] – surnames beginning with V and W (XXXV-XLII)

ז [Zayn] – surnames beginning with Z (XLII-XLV)

ט [Tes/Tet] – surnames beginning with C and T (XLV-XLVII)

י [Yud] – surnames beginning with J and Y (XLVII-XLIX)

כ  [Chof] – surnames beginning with Ch (XLIX-L)

ט [Tes/Tet] – surnames beginning with T (LI-LI)

ל [Lamed] – surnames beginning with L (LI-LVIII)

מ [Mem] – surnames beginning with M (LVIII-LXI)

נ [Nun] – surnames beginning with N (LXII-LXIII)

ט [Samech] – surnames beginning with C and S – L and N listed out of order (LXIII-LXVIII)

ע  [Ayin] – surnames beginning with E (LXVIII-LXIX)

[Pey] – surnames beginning with P (LXX-LXXII)

[Fey] – surnames beginning with F (LXXII-LXXVIII)

צ [Tzadik]  – surnames beginning with C and T (LXXVIII-LXXXII)

ק [Kuf] – surnames beginning with K (LXXXII-XCIV)

ר [Reish] – surnames beginning with R (XCIV-XCVIII)

ש [Shin] – surnames beginning with S (XCIX-CVIII)

Addendum – miscellaneous surnames (CIX-CXVI)

Częstochowers in the Fight Against Fascism (CXVII-CXXXVIII)

Those Who Have Gone to Their Eternal Repose (CXXXIX-CXLIV)

Index of Names Appearing in this Yizkor Book


ENGLISH TRANSLATION:

Dave Horowitz-Larochette


IMPORTANT NOTICE

While the English translation is available for download, it may not, either in part or as a whole, be distributed or published without the prior written permission of Andrew Rajcher, the copyright-holder of this English-language version of this Yizkor Book.


The Ghettos - Warsaw, Częstochowa

The Ghettos - Warsaw, Częstochowa (1945)

Possibly one of the first Yizkor Books published after World War II.

This Yizkor Book, by Adam Zilbersztajn, was published in Israel in December 1945. Of all the Yizkor Books relating to Częstochowa, this must be the earliest or one of the earliest to be published after the War.

As such, the memories of the events, contained in this book, must have been very fresh in the author’s mind at the time of writing. This, according to Professor Dariusz Stola, former Director of the POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews, makes this book “an historical treasure”.

We do not know whether the author wrote the book’s chapters near the dates to which he refers in chapter headings (e.g. “Warsaw 1941), or at War’s end. Either way, his memories give us yet another vision of the tragic events in both Częstochowa and Warsaw.

We have known about the existence of this book for a long time and, for a long time, we have endeavoured to obtain a copy or scan of the book for us to be able to translate it into English. Thanks mainly to the efforts of World Society Vice-President Alon Goldman, we were able to receive a clear scan of the book, thus enabling us to have it professionally translated into English.

[Webmaster: As far as we know, this is the first PROFESSIONAL, English-language translation of this book.]


This Yizkor book has been PROFESSIONALLY translated into English
– for the FIRST TIME in its entirety!

To view or download a PDF scan of this original Yizkor Book in HEBREW,
click HERE

The professional English translation of this Częstochowa Yizkor book has been made possible by the financial support of the

Wolf Rajcher z”l and Dora Rajcher z”l were both Holocaust survivors from Częstochowa.

They were prisoners in both the “Big Ghetto” and the “Small Ghetto” and, until liberation, were slave labourers in HASAG-Pelcery. Following the War, they emigrated to Melbourne Australia.

Upon the passing of both his parents, their son, Andrew Rajcher, established this charitable fund in their memory.

English-translated chapters are listed below in the order in which they appear in the Yizkor Book.
(The numbers in brackets, after each article, correspond to the appropriate page numbers in the book.)

Introduction (1-2)

Table of Contents (compiled by translator)

Warsaw 1941 (3-12)

The [Ha’Shomer Ha’Tzair] Movement at the Beginning of the War (12-23)

The Agricultural Farm and Kibbutz in Częstochowa (23-31)

The Department of Statistics (31-34)

“Testing Facilities” – Informational Operations Amidst the Jewish Public (35-44)

“The Small Deportations” in the Reich – Mordche Meets Merin (44-49)

The Great Deportation from Warsaw – “Vernichtungskommandos” (Extermination Squads) (50-57)

The Deaths of Józef and Szmul – Józef’s Will (57-62)

The Fighting Organisation’s First Operations (62-67)

The Deportation from Częstochowa and the Vicinity (67-75)

The Battle of 18th January in Warsaw (75-81)

Relations with the Polish Underground (81-85)

The Weapons Problem (85-97)

The Ghetto on the Eve of the Liquidation – “The Battle of the Newspapers” (97-102)

The Revolt (102-111)

The Liquidation of the Ghetto in Częstochowa (111-115)

The Poles (115-122)


ENGLISH TRANSLATION:

Dave Horowitz-Larochette


IMPORTANT NOTICE

While this English translation is available for download, it may not, either in part or as a whole, be distributed or published without the prior written permission of Andrew Rajcher, this English-language version copyright-holder.



The Community of Żarki

The Community of Żarki (1959)

A Town in Its Life and in Its Destruction

This Yizkor Book was published, in Israel in 1959, by the Organisation of Żarki Jews in Israel. Its Editor is Yitzchak Lador. The majority of its articles were written in Hebrew, while the articles in the last section, “Żarki in Life and in Death” were written in Yiddish.

According to this Yizkor Book’s Organising Committee:

This book, which we have before us and which is dedicated to our ‘shtetl’, contains testimonies and memoirs near to the heart of all the Żarki landsleit, wherever they may be.

The book raises before our eyes Żarki’s distant and recent past, as well as the days of the Great Holocaust which passed over our town, until its bitter end, when all the people of the ‘shtetl’ were annihilated – and now only a few individuals are scattered throughout the globe, the majority in Israel.

It is our hope that this memorial endeavour will stand as a living monument for the younger generation and those of the future.

[Webmaster: As far as we know, this is the first COMPLETE, PROFESSIONAL, English-language translation of this book. To the best of our knowledge, prior to this, only the Table of Contents and Necrology seem to have ever been translated into English.]


This Yizkor book has been PROFESSIONALLY translated into English
– for the FIRST TIME in its entirety!

The professional English translation of this Żarki Yizkor book has been made possible by the financial support of the

Wolf Rajcher z”l and Dora Rajcher z”l were both Holocaust survivors from Częstochowa.

They were prisoners in both the “Big Ghetto” and the “Small Ghetto” and, until liberation, were slave labourers in HASAG-Pelcery. Following the War, they emigrated to Melbourne Australia.

Upon the passing of both his parents, their son, Andrew Rajcher, established this charitable fund in their memory.

Click on SECTION HEADINGS to reveal chapters.
Chapters are listed in the order in which they appear in the Yizkor Book.
(The numbers in brackets, after each article, correspond to the appropriate page numbers in the book.)

Introduction & Table of Contents (1-4)

With the Appearance of This Book (5-6)

Yitzchak Lador: One of the Burning Candles … (7-12)

A. Ajzenberg: Yizkor! (13-13)

Mordche Gebirtig – Abram Lewenson: The Shtetl is Burning … (14-14)

THE TOWN IN THOSE DAYS

Pinchas Wajnberg: The Shtetl Żarki in its Traditional Ways (17-65)

Yakow Fajner: “Revolutionary” Winds are Blowing (69-78)

Pinchas Lauden: The Ha’Shomer Ha’Tzair Cell in Żarki (78-87)

Jechaskiel Majtlis: Ha’Chalutz and Maccabi in Żarki (87-97)

Lipa Hirsz: 2nd November 1917 in Żarki (97-98)

A. Ajzenberg: The Town in Its Years of Awakening (98-104)

Izrael Majtlis: Żarki My Town (104-106)

Izrael Majtlis: Żarki My Town (104-106)

Jakow Fiszer: The Matter of the Holocaust (109-143)

Uszer Lauden: The Last Days of Żarki (143-160)

Josef Siwek: Myszków (Fragments of a Diary) (160-164)

Aron Brandes: The End of the Jews in Żarki (164-180)

Chajka Klinger: A Visit in Żarki (181-181)

H.Tzemach: In Memory of the Martyrs I Knew in Żarki (182-182)

Abraham Shlonski: A Vow (Poem) (183-183)

Aron Brandes: The Last Chapter in the Life of Cwi Brandes (187-189)

Chajka Klinger: How Has Cwi Fallen? (189-191)

A.L.: Perec (Berisz) Frank (192-194)

Malka: Juda, Son of Cwi-Ze’ew Sztajnbrecher (Chatzav) (195-195)

Eliszewa: Mordche (Motek) Sztorchain (196-197)

Sz.Korcfeld: From the Dreary Past (198-198)

Abram-Josef Sztybel: With My Heart (201-204)

A.Ajzenberg: Figures from the Town (205-207)

Pinchas Wajnberg: Personalities & Ways of Life (207-213)

Abraszka Ajzenberg: Żarki-Myszków (213-215)

Abram Ajzenberg: About the Brandes Household (215-216)

Yehoshua Ben‐Tzvi: The Spring in Leśniów (217-218)

Introduction to Yiddish Section (220-221)

M.Gebirtig: The Shtetl is Burning – Dos Shtetl Brent (222-222)

Jakow (Jancze) Fiszer: The Destruction and Annihilation of Jewish Żarki (223-281)

Cypora Szporn‐Ajzenberg: Pages from the Sorrowful Past (281-288)

Zalman Grynszpan: Two Last Letters (288-289)

Abram Frank: Pages From an Old Diary (290-294)

Szajndla Preger-Tajtelbaum: My Memories (294-301)

Eliezer (Lejzer) Ryterband: About the Shtetl of My Birth (301-304)

Jakow Fiszer: A Look Back (304-310)

Abram Ajzenberg: My Shtetl (Episodes) (310-313)

Yakow Fiszer: Liquidation [a poem] (314-315)

A.A.: In Memory of Jechiel Rozyner z’’l (316-316)

A Kaddish for Our Loved Ones (317-318)

Necrology – Names of the Heads of Families in the Shtetl Who Perished During the Holocaust (319-324)


ENGLISH TRANSLATION:

Dave Horowitz-Larochette


IMPORTANT NOTICE

While this English translation is available for download, it may not, either in part or as a whole, be distributed or published without the prior written permission of Andrew Rajcher, this English-language version copyright-holder.


A hard copy of this English-language translation may be purchased from JewishGen by clicking HERE.



Krzepice - "Beyond Silence"

"Beyond Silence" (2015)

- by Moshe Dekel z"l, the son of Krzepice Holocaust Survivors

Moshe Dekel (Chaskelewicz) z”l was born in Munich to Krzepice Holocaust survivor parents. As a child, he tried asking his parents about their lives during the War years – and was met with silence. Dekel did not give up. As an adult, he tried to reveal the painful memories and secrets.

Having no one to ask, Dekel used radio programmes and newspaper articles to locate survivors, who knew a little about his parents. And so, from meeting to meeting, Moshe reveals a little more and another scrap of information from the past his parents had wished to conceal.

Dekel documents the exciting meetings and surprising stories he heard in his book “Beyond Silence” – a book which has turned into a sort of quest for roots, or a fascinating detective story, which traces the experiences of his family members and of Polish Jewry as a whole. Anyone who grew up in the home of Holocaust survivors can identify with it.

This quote comes from the book’s editor and publisher, Orly Amit. It is obviously the personal story of a man on a quest for his roots. However, it does contain a great deal of information about Krzepice and the vicinity, including Częstochowa.

In the absence of any formal Krzepice Yizkor Book, it has been decided to treat it as a “pseudo Yizkor Book”, to translate it into English and to publish it, here, on our website.

To this end, our translator, Dave Horowicz-Larochette, wrote to Orly Amit, seeking permission to do this.

Orly’s reply came prompty, stating:

Moshe Dekel z”l, to our great sorrow, passed away about a year and a half ago. I have approached his wife Zahava and she has given her permission to translate the book. She says that her husband, Moshe z”l, would have certainly agreed and would also have rejoiced in the initiative which originates from a desire to commemorate communities and to document the events of the Holocaust.

We sincerely thank Zahava Dekel for giving us permission to translate and publish her late husband’s book and Orly Amit for assisting us in this endeavour. We have made every effort to convey, in English, what her late husband expressed in Hebrew.

(The picture in the top left-hand corner is that of Moshe’s father, Majer Chaskelewicz z”l, in Polish Army uniform.)

This “pseudo Yizkor Book” has now been PROFESSIONALLY translated into English
– in its entirety – for the FIRST TIME!

The professional English translation of this Krzepice “pseudo Yizkor book” has been made possible by the financial support of the

Wolf Rajcher z”l and Dora Rajcher z”l were both Holocaust survivors from Częstochowa.

They were prisoners in both the “Big Ghetto” and the “Small Ghetto” and, until liberation, were slave labourers in HASAG-Pelcery. Following the War, they emigrated to Melbourne Australia.

Upon the passing of both his parents, their son, Andrew Rajcher, established this charitable fund in their memory.

Chapters are listed in the order in which they appear in the Yizkor Book.
(The numbers in brackets, after each article, correspond to the appropriate page numbers in the booklet.)

Introduction (1-3)

Table of Contents (5-5)

Preface (9-13)

The Beginnings of the Quest: Munich and the Hospital in Which I was Born (14-20)

The Towns Częstochowa, Krzepice and Lututów (21-31)

My Volunteer Work for the Holocaust Survivors (32-40)

The Work of Radio Personality Yaron Enosh (41-43)

First Meeting – Ester Pe’eri (née Mendelewicz) (44-52)

Second Meeting – Rachel Geshuri (née Granek) (53-57)

Third Meeting – Sh. (née Granek) (58-60)

Fourth Meeting – Hinda Klug (née Granek) (61-62)

Fifth Meeting – Fela Kopel (née Lachman) (63-72)

Sixth Meeting – Moti Cheruti – the Ural Mountains (73-74)

Seventh Meeting – Josef and Chana (née Lachman) Kamil (75-79)

Eighth Meeting – Cesia (Cypora) Granek (80-83)

The New Appeal to Yaron Enosh (84-85)

Ninth Meeting – Yaakov W. and [his mother] Frida (née Monat) (86-95)

Tenth Meeting – Abram-Abe Besser (96-100)

My Father Majer Chaskelewicz (101-108)

My Mother Miriam Chaskelewicz (109-113)

My Uncle Juda (Lajb) Halperin and His Family (114-117)

Zvi (Hersz) Cirulnik (118-121)

The Journey to Poland, July 2009 (122-134)

Closing Words (135-137)

A List of the Victims (138-141)


ENGLISH TRANSLATION:

Dave Horowitz-Larochette


IMPORTANT NOTICE

While this English translation is available for download, it may not, either in part or as a whole, be distributed or published without the prior written permission of Andrew Rajcher, this English-language version copyright-holder.



The Prospect of a Krzepice Yizkor Book

The Prospect of a Krzepice Yizkor Book (1963)

- a Matzevah for the Town of Krzepice and the Vicinity

The town of Krzepice lies in the Kłobuck County of the Śłąsk Province of Poland – around 17.5 kilometres from Częstochowa. At the outbreak of World War II, the town’s population was approximately 5,000 – 45% of whom were Jews. 

In 1941 and at the start of 1942, skilled Jewish labourers were selected in the Krzepice ghetto and deported to the ghetto in Częstochowa. On 22nd June 1942, the majority of the Jews in Krzepice were deported to the Auschwitz-Birkenau extermination camp. The remainder were deported to the Sosnowiec ghetto from where, later, they too were sent to Auschwitz-Birkenau.

Krzepice’s last remaining Jewish resident passed away in 1993.

In 1963, the Organisation of Krzepice and Vicinity Jews in Israel formed a Yizkor Book Committee and compiled this booklet, the main purpose of which was to appeal to Krzepice landsleit, around the world, to submit material for a proposed Krzepice Yizkor Book.

Included in the booklet is a chronological timeline of the history of the town of Krzepice, a brief history of the Kuźniczka Shule and an outline of the chapters to be included in the proposed Krzepice Yizkor Book.

However, there is no sign of any Krzepice Yizkor Book – either online or in any online library catalogues where it would be expected to have been included. We suspect that the proposed Yizkor Book may have never actually been written but, if anyone knows of its existence or can shed any light on why the project never actually went ahead – please contact our Webmaster. (Click on the envelope icon at the top of this page.)

[Webmaster: Much of this booklet is written in Yiddish and duplicated in Hebrew.]


This Yizkor booklet has now been PROFESSIONALLY translated into English in its entirety
– for the FIRST TIME!

The professional English translation of this Krzepice Yizkor booklet has been made possible by the financial support of the

Wolf Rajcher z”l and Dora Rajcher z”l were both Holocaust survivors from Częstochowa.

They were prisoners in both the “Big Ghetto” and the “Small Ghetto” and, until liberation, were slave labourers in HASAG-Pelcery. Following the War, they emigrated to Melbourne Australia.

Upon the passing of both his parents, their son, Andrew Rajcher, established this charitable fund in their memory.

Chapters are listed in the order in which they appear in the Yizkor Booklet.
(The numbers in brackets, after each article, correspond to the appropriate page numbers in the booklet.)

Introduction (1-2)

From the Yizkor Book Committee (3-5)

A repetition, in Hebrew, of what was written, in Yiddish, on pages 3-5 (6-7)

A Historical Chronology of the Town of Krzepice (8-9)

The Shule in Kuźniczka (9-11)

Yizkor – May G-d Remember (11-11)

Yizkor – Memorial Monument (12-17)

In Memory of Our Town Krzepice (17-20)

Chassidim in Krzepice (20-21)

A repetition, in Yiddish, of what was written, in Hebrew, on pages 8-9 (21-23)

Regarding the History of the Jews in Krzepice (24-24)


ENGLISH TRANSLATION:

Dave Horowitz-Larochette


IMPORTANT NOTICE

While this English translation is available for download, it may not, either in part or as a whole, be distributed or published without the prior written permission of Andrew Rajcher, this English-language version copyright-holder.



The Book of Częstochowa - Volume 2

The Book of Częstochowa (1968) - Volume 2

Sefer Czenstochow

According to Dr.hab.Magdalena Ruta of the Department of Jewish Studies of the Jagiellonian University in Kraków:

In 1967-1968, a two-volume work was published in Jerusalem. In both Yiddish and Hebrew, it was entitled Sefer Czenstochow [The Book of Częstochow] and was edited by M. Szucman. Its contributors included such well-known names as Jakub Szacki (dec. 1956), Szlomo Waga and Dawid Koniecpoler.

The first volume contains articles about the history of the Jews in the city (by J. Szacki and Sz. Śpiwak), which were divided by topic: Jewish communal institutions in the 19th and 20th centuries, political movements, charitable institutions, commercial life, education and culture, religious life, as well as portraits of individuals associated with the religious life. Pages 637-760 contain the memoirs photographs of people associated with the city.

The second volume is devoted to the Holocaust and the functioning of the ghetto, e.g. religious life, the children, party organisations, etc. Other wartime topics include deportations to Treblinka, the mass murders, Polish-Jewish relations (e.g. the chapter entitled Mencsclecher tat fun a poilisher froi [The Humane Response of a Polish Woman] by Szmuel Niski), the resistance and uprising in HASAG, Jews in the city following liberation, portraits of Częstochowa Jewish activists in the diaspora, landsmannschaften in Israel, the USA, Canada, Argentina, Australia and Paris. The book contains the memoirs of individual people (pp. 285−325), including shorts texts about the co-authors of previous memorial books – E. Chrobołowski, Rafael Federman, Prof. Wolf Lesław and Josef Kojfman. A part of the book is devoted to neighbouring Jewish  communities in Krzepice, Żarki, Kłobuck, Lelów, Kamyk, Janów, Olsztyn, Mstów, Pajęczno and Koniecpol. The illustrated material includes pictures of the city, people and activities, copies of various documents, as well as maps.

There is no English translation of this book. [Webmaster: until NOW!]


FOR THE FIRST TIME,

both complete volumes of this Yizkor book
have now been PROFESSIONALLY translated into English.

The professional English translation of this two-volume Yizkor book has been made possible by the financial support of the

Wolf Rajcher z”l and Dora Rajcher z”l were both Holocaust survivors from Częstochowa.

They were prisoners in both the “Big Ghetto” and the “Small Ghetto” and, until liberation, were slave labourers in HASAG-Pelcery. Following the War, they emigrated to Melbourne Australia.

Upon the passing of both his parents, their son, Andrew Rajcher, established this charitable fund in their memory.

VOLUME 2

Click on SECTION HEADINGS to reveal chapters.
Chapters are listed in the order in which they appear in the Yizkor Book.
(The numbers in brackets, after each article, correspond to the appropriate column numbers in the volume.)

Introduction (1-8)

The Book Committee: From Generation to Generation (9-20)

Zvi Wiernik: The Holocaust on European Jewry (25-28)

Szlojme Waga: The Germans in Częstochowa (29-32)

Mojsze Konsens: It Began Even Before the War (33-36)

Dawid Koniecpoler z’’l: Tearful Dates (37-46)

L.Bergman: The First Victims (47-48)

Registration for Forced Labour Announcement (49-52)

Szlojme Waga: Looting and Sadism (51-58)

Chaim Szymonowicz: Terror and Destruction (57-62)

Szlojme Waga: Extermination (61-72)

Natan Eck: In the City of Good Hope (71-86)

Szmul Niski: The Ruined Yom Kippur (85-88)

Czaryski Janusz: The Mass Grave on Ulica Kawia [Street] (87-90)

Chaim Birnholc: Men Killed for a Few Potatoes (91-94)

Szmul Niski: A Polish Woman’s Good Deed (93-94)

Zvi Rozenwajn: The Workers Council in Częstochowa (95-100)

Szlojme Waga: The Terror Increases (101-114)

Zvi Rozenwajn: The Aleje After the Destruction (113-116)

Szlojme Waga: The Fifth Akcja (115-122)

J. Rużański: After the Liquidation of the “Small Ghetto” (121-126)

Chaim Szymonowicz: An Evening Service in the Daytime (125-125)

Zvi Majerowicz: The “Kapo” Changed His Mind (127-128)

Noach Edelist: Religious Jewry in the Holocaust (129-132)

The Book Committee: Religious Life in “HASAG” (131-134)

W.Gliksman: The Destruction of the New Synagogue (135-138)

Lipman Rajcher: The Shabbes Kitchen (Shabbes-Kych) in the “Big Ghetto” (137-138)

Children in the Holocaust (139-140)

Juda Cymerman: The Gordonia Movement in the Holocaust (139-140)

Hela Wajnrach: Hiding Inside a Machine (141-142)

Chaim Szymonowicz: All Israel is Responsible (143-144)

Yeshayahu Landau: The Use of Poison (144-144)

Szlojme Waga: The New Ghetto (145-156)

Chaim Szymonowicz: On the Day of Liberation (155-156)

Izaak Wiślicki: The Road to Treblinka (157-160)

Aron Gelbard: Nineteen Days in Treblinka (159-164)

Arie Kudlik: I Was Freed By the Revolt (165-170)

Szmul Willenberg: The Revolt in Treblinka (169-174)

Częstochowa Jewish Cemetery: The Częstochowa Partisans Monument (177-178)

Szlojme (Stefan) Grajek: The Struggle of the Częstochowa Jews (181-184)

Ajzik Diamant: The Beacon of Fire in the Dead of Night (185-188)

Yeshayahu [Szaja] Landau: Fortitude of Spirit (189-196)

Zvi [Hersz; Jacek, Heniek] Wiernik: In the Struggle Against the Nazi Beast (197-214)

Jakób Alebarde: Conspiratorial Activities (215-216)

Maciej (Mojsze) Krauze: Ready for Battle (217-220)

Adam Sztajnbrecher: Resistance in HASAG-Pelcery (221-230)

Chunon Kiel: The Hero Machel Birencwajg z’’l (231-234)

Jakób Leber: Sabotage with Delft Tiles for Cookers (235-236)

Abram Wirsztel: Members of “Freiheit” Create “Fives” (236-237)

Bolek Gwircman: The Chronicle of the Koniecpol Unit (238-270)

Dawid Koniecpoler z’’l: The Workshop at Aleja 14 (273-275)

Zvi Wiernik: The Złoty Potok Group (275-277)

Sara Edelist [née Gutgold]: The History of the Underground Group “66” (277-282)

The Book Committee: The ŻOB in Pilica (283-284)

Memorial Stones (285-326)

In Memory of the Heroes (327-332)

Moshe Yishai: This is How I Remember My City (337-344)

Szaja Landau: The Bygone Częstochowa Community (343-352)

Dr Zvi Kantor z’’l: The Glory and Radiance of Jewish Częstochowa (352-353)

Izaak Wiszlicki: With the Harassed Folk of Częstochowa (354-356)

The “Ichud” Zionist Organisation in Częstochowa (358-358)

After the War (361-380)

Izaak Wiszlicki: Murders – Already After Liberation (381-382)

Majer Rotholc: How the Banners Were Concealed (381-384)

E. Ben-Moshe: Dr Józef Kruk (389-392)

Abram Zak (Buenos Aires): Dr Józef Kruk (391-396)

The Book Committee: Reb Szlojme Zalman Shragai (originally Fajwlowicz) (395-398)

The Book Committee: Reb Jakób Leslau (399-402)

E. Ben-Moshe : Reb Jakób Lewit (401-404)

E.B.M.: Dr Elyahu Horowicz (405-406)

The Book Committee: Abram J. Gotlib (407-410)

The Book Committee: Simcha Rajch (409-410)

The Book Committee: Isachar Szwarcbaum (409-410)

Częstochowers in the “Brigade” (411-412)

E.H.: Uszer Ilan (Szwarcbaum) (411-414)

Ha’Shomer Ha’Tzair in Israel (1963) (413-414)

Moshe: Mojsze Klarman z’’l (415-416)

The Book Committee: Captain Michael (Micha) Ron-Besserglik z’’l (417-418)

Dawid Gliksman z’’l (419-420)

Felix Beatus (419-422)

E.B.M.:Mordechai (Motek) Kusznir z’’l (421-424)

J.Ch. Plai (Filik): Reb Berisz Częstochowski z’’l (423-424)

D.Sz. Kamiński z’’l: Reb Srul Kamiński z’’l (425-426)

The Book Committee: Duwid Majer Granek z’’l (427-428)

The Book Committee: Józef Arieli (Kaluszyński) z’’l (427-428)

Ezriel Ben-Moshe: Juda (Judl) Dancyger z’’l (429-430)

E. Ben-Moshe: Perec Lasker z’’l (429-432)

Tzemach Tzmarion: Dr Zvi Kantor z’’l (431-434)

The Book Committee: Izrael Tyberg z’’l (433-434)

The Book Committee: Jakub Tyberg z’’l (433-436)

The Book Committee: Juda Srebnik (435-438)

Abram Gotlib: The Association of Częstochowa Jews in Israel (437-442)

M.Ch. Tyberg: Religious Pioneers in Israel (441-444)

The Max Fein Vocational School in Tel-Aviv Adopts Jewish Częstochowa (445-446)

A Glorious Chapter from the Near Past (447-454)

Godl Frajtag: Częstochowa Landsleit Fight and Build (453-456)

Częstochowers in Jerusalem (455-456)

Częstochowers in Haifa (457-458)

Karl Wargon: “United Czenstochover Relief Committee” and “Ladies Auxiliary” in New York (465-468)

Ezriel Ben-Moshe (Jakubowicz): Opening Ceremony of the Kfar Saba Children’s Home (469-472)

E.Ben-Moshe: Rafał Federman (471-474)

Rafał Federman (473-474)

The Book Committee: Kune Chrobołowski (473-476)

Prof. Wolf Leslau (475-476)

Józef Kaufman (477-478)

G.F.: Szmul Prokosz (477-478)

Harry Grauman: Częstochower Society in Los Angeles (479-480)

Abram Gotlib: Henry Grauman, Los Angeles (481-482)

Abram Gotlib: Majer (Max) Fefer (481-482)

Mojsze Krauze: Czestochowa and Chicago (483-486) and (509-510)

The Book Committee: Mojsze Ceszyński z’’l (485-486)

Ruben Luks: Czenstochover Society in Detroit (487-488)

Ruben Luks: Kalman Grosberg (487-488)

Dr Benjamin Orenstein: The Częstochower Landsmannschaft  of Montreal (489-490)

Mojsze Frank: The Częstochower Landsmannschaft  of Toronto (491-494)

Jakób L. Jakubowicz : The Częstochower Circle in Argentina (493-498)

I. Gans (Gancwajch) z’’l : The Częstochower Circle in Australia (497-502)

The Book Committee: Izrael Leib Gancwajch* z’’l – Australia (501-502)

The Book Committee: Leibel Rayman [Rajman] (501-502)

The Book Committee: Dr Leib Kurland (Paris) (501-502)

Dr Kurland: Jews from Częstochowa in the Vicinity of Paris (503-504)

Mojsze Wajnman: The “Friends of Częstochowa” Society in Paris (505-510)

Towns Around Częstochowa (517-524)

M.Sh.Geshuri: Amstov [Mstów] (Emes-Tov) [Truly Good] (524-528)

Yehuda Kishon: The “Twin Towns” of Pajęczno and Sulmierzyce (527-530)

Daniel Pagan (Chicago): Koniecpol (529-532)

Bibliography (531-536)

Table of Contents (537-542)

In Memoriam (I-III)

The Degania Bet Group [Kibbutz] (V)

Chaim Benclowicz: The Benclowicz, Grynman, Lenkiński and Wajsberg Families (VI)

Jakób Benclowicz: About the House of My Father z”l (VII)

The Braun, Pomeranc and Wajnsztok Families (VIII)

The Granek Family (IX)

The Granek Family (X)

The Dzialecki Family (XI)

The Wajsfelner Family (XII)

The Tyberg Family (XIII)

The Lenczner Family (XIV)

The Srebrnik Family (XV)

The Epsztajn Family (XVI)

The Cygler Family (XVII)

The Rajchman Family (XVIII)

The Rajcher Family (XIX)

The Rapaport and Lewkowicz Families (XX)

The Frankenberg and Szancer Families (XXI)

The Sztajnhart and Landau Families (XXII)

The Szyldhaus and Kantor Families (XXIII)

The Szapiro (Szpiro) Family (XXIV)

The Gotlib and Berliner Families (XXV)

The Holand and Gutfrajnd Families (XXVI)

The Zborowski and Gelbard Families (XXVII)

The Grauer and Grauman Families (XXVIII)

The Lewkowicz and Cytter Families (XXIX)

The Fuks and Najman Families (XXX)

The Kolin and Danielewicz Families (XXXI)

The Kalka and Gotlib Families (XXXII)

The Krakowski and Wajnsztok Families (XXXIII)

The Szuldynger and Waldberg Families (XXXIV)

The Engel and Erlich Families (XXXV)

The Berger and Szwarcbaum Families (XXXVI)

The Brukarz and Galster Families (XXXVII)

The Gancwajch and Diamant Families (XXXVIII)

The Gliksman Family (XXXIX)

The Granek and Hofman Families (XL)

The Willinger Family (XLI)

The Jakubowicz and Lewenhof Families (XLII)

The Lew (Lewkowicz) and Lipski Families (XLIII)

The Lancman and Lenczner Families (XLIV)

The Samsonowicz and Fogel Families (XLV)

The Koniecpoler and Wasserman Families (XLVI)

The Kornberg and Klajman Families (XLVII)

The Rozencwajg and Ruszecki Families (XLVIII)

The Rychtygier and Szwarcbaum Families (XLIX)

The Szulowicz and Szternberg Families (L)

The Szczerbala, Orbach and Brzuski Families (LI)

The Zilbersztajn, Zelcer and Lewkowicz Families (LII)

The Klajman, Rajcher and Szpigelman Families (LIII)

The Liberman, Langfus, Niziński and Fridman Families (LIV)

The Cymerman, Kuszynski and Krauze Families (LV)

The Rozencwajg-Rużanski, Szwarcbaum, Szajkowicz and Szymonowicz Families (LVI)

The Gotlib, Szwarcbaum, Goldrajch, Grundman and Hauptman Families (LVII)

The Haberman, Wiernik, Cohen and Mandel Families (LVIII)

The Fajerman, Frank, Cymerman and Kolin Families (LIX)

The Kurland, Kromołowski, Kartuz and Rozencwajg Families (LX)

The Rozental, Rajcher, Sztybel and Szczekacz Families (LXI)

The Abramowicz, Borkowski, Bieruski, Guterman, Herszlikowicz, Wilinger, Wajntraub and Wiślicki Families (LXII)

The Warszawski, Zomper, Zilberberg, Jechimowicz, Jakubowicz, Kon, Lorje and Laks Families (LXIII)

The Milsztajn, Fiksel, Frank, Fridman, Częstochowski, Kolin, Kuszynski and Rozen Families (LXIV)

The Rajchman, Sztrajsberg, Szychter, Szylit, Szajnweksler, Rozen, Szperling and Berman Families (LXV)

The Abramowicz, Essig, Bocian, Gryn, Horowicz, Halperin, Wajsfelner and Wiewiorka Families (LXVI)

The Tobiasz, Jarzombek, Lewkowicz, Nutkiewicz, Niski, Federman, Fajerman and Fiszhof Families (LXVII)

The Baum, Częstochowski, Działoszyński, Krakauer, Haper, Rotner, Rapoport, Zalcberg, Moszkowicz, Landgarten, Lustiger, Muszynski, Landau, Potok, Storozum, Rotholc, Pfefer and Szlingbaum Families (LXVIII)

The Obrach and Helfgot Families (LXIX)

The Judkiewicz, Kopel, Amsterdamer and Aleksandrowicz Families (LXX)

The Goldberg, Wolman, Jakubowicz, Lancman, Laskowski, Majerowicz, Kifer and Rosenberg Families (LXXI)

The Kantor, Kon, Moszkowicz, Rzonsiński, Plawner, Borzykowski, Lenczycki and Szprynger Families (LXXII)

The Wolman and Jelen Families (LXXIII)

The Frajlich, Rużański, Szenwald, Wajnman and Braun Families (LXXIV)

The Rostensztajn and Kremski Families (LXXV)

The Grinsztajn and Widman Families (LXXVI)

The Bida, Ratner and Fisz Families (LXXVII)

The Wolski, Birnholc and Gliksman Families (LXXVIII)

To view this Yizkor Book in its original Yiddish/Hebrew format
click HERE.


ENGLISH TRANSLATION:

Dave Horowitz-Larochette


IMPORTANT NOTICE

While the English translation is available for download, it may not, either in part or as a whole, be distributed or published without the prior written permission of Andrew Rajcher, the English-language version copyright-holder.


Other fully or partially translated
Częstochowa Yizkor Books are available on

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